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Full text of "The Tattler"


TATTLER 71 



Williamsburg High School 
Williamsburg, Massachusetts 

Vol. 48 
Senior Class Of Williamsburg High School 



To everything (turn, turn, turn) 

There is a season (turn, turn, turn) 

And a time for every purpose under heaven. 




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time to be born, a time to die; 
time to plant, a time to reap; 
time to kill, a time to heal; 
time to laugh, a time to weep. 



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4 



MAIN STREET. WILLIAMSBURGH. MASSACHUSETTS - 1834 



A time to build up, a time to break down; 

A time to dance, a time to mourn; 

A time to cast away stones, 

A time to gather stones together. 








A time of love, a time of hate; 
A time of war, a time of peace; 
A time you may embrace, 
A time to refrain from embracing. 




W. 







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Contents 



Editorial 



Many events make a school year memorable. 
Not only are the material achievements im- 
portant, but also those purposes and endeavors 
for which we strive. In this 1971 Tattler, we 
have tried to capture a glimpse of these efforts 
-- those in extracurricular and athletic events 
as well as in the classroom. Designing class 
rings, attending curriculum day workshops, 
and planning a student handbook were only a 
few of the ways in which students used their 
creativity and perception to attain their goals 
We hope that you, too, will feel the "spirit of 
'71" as you read this, the last chapter of the 
story of Williamsburg High School. 



Autumn 


9 


Winter 


21 


Spring 


35 


Classes 


47 


Seniors 


63 


Patrons 


78 



The gathering, the grouping 

Of friends, homework, and classmates, 

Ready to give, sharing . . . 



AUTUMN 








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BI-COUNTY CHAMPS 

FRONT ROW: Joe Con- 
nell, Steve Demerski, 
Ray LaCourse, Dave 
Pierce, Bob Nehring, Paul 
Bauver, and Steve McKay. 
LAST ROW: Harry Warner, 
Sam Williston, Dale 
Beals, John Clark, Dave 
Bauver, Coach Dave 
| Grills, Don Munson, Rick 
Scott, Bob Gover, and 
Steve Clark. ABSENT: Al 
Estes. 




Williamsburg Cross-Country 



Williamsburg experienced a few disappointing 
moments during the 1970 cross country season; 
namely, a shut-out at the hands of Greenfield, 
and a costly loss to arch rival Amherst Regional, 
and a third place finish in the Northern Division 
of the Western Mass . League . 

The rewards which hopefully outweighed the set- 
backs included Don Munson's seven individual 
victories, a third place finish in the Western 
Mass . Championships for a team crippled with 
injuries to three big runners, a second consecu- 
tive Bi -County League Championship, and an 
opportunity to compete in the State Meet in 
Boston . 

This year's contingent was capably captained by 
seniors Don Munson and Dave Bauver. Other top 
performers included John Clark, Rick Scott, 
Steve Clark, Sam Williston, Dale Beals, Al Estes, 
Harry Warner, and Bob Gover. 

Bob Nehring, Steve McKay, Dave Pierce, Ray 
LaCourse, Joe Connell, and Paul Bauver who all 
gained considerable experience will provide the 
nucleus for the 1971 cross country team in the 10 
Hampshire Regional School. 




Coach Grills and Co-Captains Don Munson and Dave 
Bauver examine their season's awards. 



Co-Captain Munson shows his drive for excellent 




v #^ 




Williamsburg takes the lead in a triangular meet versus Southwick and Palmer. 



Enjoys Outstanding Year 




CROSS COUNTRY 1970 



lliamsburg 




Opponent 


21 


at Holyoke Catholic 


38 


40 


Cathedral 


19 


17 


Southwick 


44 


20 


Palmer 


41 


16 


At Granby 


46 


31 


Pioneer 


25 


21 


Turners Falls 


36 1/2 


15 


Frontier 


50 


21 


Northampton 


40 


19 


at Mohawk 


44 


16 


at Amherst 


43 


16 


at Gateway 


47 


40 


* Greenfield 


15 


26 


* Minnechaug 


31 




iangular at U . Mass 




Rebecca Greenberg, Ellen Ames, and Judy LeBeau reluctantly display the freshman motto 



Seniors Reign Supreme 




Beth Brown and Fern Carver model the evening's 
fashions. 



12 




Brown, Fern Carver, Betsy Everett, and Cheryl 
>n are now ready to face the seniors. 



James Warner gets the shaving cream treatment. 

Friday, November thirteenth, saw the 
initiation of the last freshman class of 
Williamsburg High School. Freshmen 
were forced to pass ice cubes, roll 
pieces of Limburger cheese across the 
floor with their noses, and dodge 
showers of shaving cream, while a few 
boys participated in a "bathing beauty" 
contest. The climax of the evening 
was the singing of the senior song, 
"Senior Power Forever", by a few 
select freshmen. 



Limburger cheese ! 





13 



Communication and cooperation were the 
key to the Student Council's progress this 
year. Working closely with the student body 
and adminstration, the Council formed 
committees to plan assemblies, to compile 
a student handbook, to plan a Fun Night, 
and to resolve student problems such as 
smoking permission and icy sidewalks. The 
Council used petitions and student polls to 
reflect student opinion towards its policies, 
and encouraged students to express their 
opinions through committees. Looking back, 
the Student Council has indeed taken a giant 
step forward towards becoming the voice of 
the student body. 




President Sam Williston narrates "The Night 
Before Christmas. " 



Student Council Stresses Communication 






1 



FRONT ROW: Marianne Watling, Richard Barrett, Miriam Graves, Sam Williston, Angela Derouin, and 
Kathy Sylvester. LAST ROW: Theodore Derouin, Joey Connell, Harry Warner, Winthrop Stone, Michael 
Quigley, Amy Edwards, Donna Russell, Linda Scaparotti, and Henry Chapin. 



14 




Again this year gym aides were instrumental 
in making gym classes function smoothly. 
These students gave up free periods during 
the week to work with the gym classes. Be- 
sides lending their help and knowledge, the 
aides gained satisfaction in seeing better 
performance in their pupils . Gym aides also 
developed qualities of leadership and learned 
to get along with many different kinds of 
people . 



Susan Nugent demonstrates correct foul shot tech- 
niques to a sixth grader. 



15 




FRONT ROW: Donna Inman, Rebecca Greenberg, Fern Carver. SECOND ROW: Valerie 
Demerski, Angela Derouin, Linda Goralski, Amy Edwards, Margaret Molloy, Marion Cham- 
berlain, Wendy Chick, Betsy Everett. LAST ROW: Kathy Sylvester, Nancy Crompton, Donna 
Bisbee, James Warner, Daniel Nehring, Michael Qui gley, Elizabeth Brown, Miss Martha 
Dickerman, Adviser. 

School News Media Shows Improvement 

The school media at Williamsburg High 
School has improved greatly this past yea: 
Our DAILY HAMPSHIRE GAZETTE corre: 
pondents, Ruth Bisbee and Linda Scaparoti 
have covered almost every facet of studen 
activity and involvement within the school 
for the GAZETTE weekly page of "High 
School Highlights." Although it was some- 
times a struggle to meet the deadline, Ru 
and Linda have found these articles an ef- 
fective means of informing the surroundin 
communities of activities as WHS. 









/, 




Also, a school newspaper, "Et Cetera, " 
has been formed this year to promote 
communication and distribute news withii 
the school. Under their adviser, Miss 
Martha Dickerman, editor Wendy Chick, 
and a most able and enthusiastic staff, "Ell 
Cetera" has proved to be a very meaningfij 
way for students to express their ideas ancl 
themselves, to find out what is happening i! 
the school, and to listen to what other stu-j 
dents are saying. 



Ruth Bisbee and Linda Scaparotti put in long hours of 
tiring work. 




FRONT ROW: Carla Bar- 
rett, typing coordinator. 
SECOND ROW: Amy Ed- 
wards, editor; Carolyn 
Greenberg, assistant edi- 
tor. LAST ROW: Margaret 
Molloy, business manager; 
Thomas Mosher, photog- 
rapher; David Bauver, 
boys' sports editor; Char- 
lene LeDuc, girls' sports 
editor. 



Tattler Staff Records WHS' Last Year 




School is a center of social, athletic, 
and educational development. In an at- 
tempt to depict all phases of this pic- 
ture, this year's Tattler staff has had 
to spend many arduous hours striving 
to capture the school and its students 
in a new and original light. Working 
diligently and enthusiastically, we have 
tried to present a realistic portrayal of 
1971, the last year of Williamsburg 
High School. We should like to extend 
many thanks to the Tattler advisers, es 
pecially Mrs. Marie Packard, who have 
devoted their time and patience through- 
out the past years to help make our 
yearbook the book it is . 






' L 






4 



FRONT ROW: Jeanne Dodge, Teresa Vayda, Di- 
ane Ryan. SECOND ROW: Mary Ann Karowski, 
Diane Krug, Donna Russell. THIRD ROW: Mar- 
garet Molloy, Susan Brown, Amy Edwards. 
FOURTH ROW: Carla Barrett, Jill Connell, Nina 
Karowski, FIFTH ROW: Carol Hebert, Charlene 
LeDuc, Joy Nietsche. SIXTH ROW: Carolyn 
Greenberg, Mary Brisbois, Kim Dresser. SEVENTH 
ROW: Thomas Mosher, Henry Chapin, David 
Bauver. 

17 



WHS Thespians 
Present Three 
One Act Plays 



i 



A variety of three one -act plays was this 
year's dramatics offering. For the first time 
the Junior High presented a play of its own, 
under the direction of Mrs. Anna Curtis. The 
play, entitled "Now That April's Here," por- 
trayed the story of a young girl's first date, 
with the plot being complicated by a case of 
measles. Next, directed by Mrs. Margaret 
Halberstadt, was "Blue Stocking." In this 
drama an aristocratic Boston lady was con- 
vinced by an old pioneer not to meddle in West- 
ern affairs. " 'Parted On Her Wedding Morn' 
or 'More to be Pitied Than Scorned' " con- 
cluded the trio. Directed by Mr. Peter Stra- 
dinski, this melodrama pitted those traditional 
enemies, the moustached villain and the 
courageous young hayseed, against each other 
in an atmosphere of hilarity. We would like 
to extend our thanks to Mrs. Eleanor Bart, 
who handled business, and to all others who 
helped to make this year's dramatics offering 
a success. 



/ 



I 



Will Desmond succeed in his plot to capture Faith T. 
heart? 





Mrs. Halberstadt, Mr. Stradinski, and Mrs. 
hard .to make the plays a success. 



Curtis worked 



18 



The art of beard-making is easily accomplish! 
by Merry Frost. 












'OPS ! Jimmy Poirier as Desmond Dalton is foiled again. 



Aw, do I have to go to bed now? 




Tf) hot to drink from the cup? Kim Dresser solves this by pouring his 
c?:ee into the saucer. 

19 



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V*. 



Library aides Rebecca Greenberg, Beth Brown, Sue Brown, Carofyn Creenberg, and Julie Bigelow prepare 
books for the shelves. 

Various Clubs Satisfy Outside Interests 



Did you ever wonder who puts the books back 
on the library shelves? This is just one of the 
many chores of the Library Aides. Under the 
able supervision of Mrs. Margaret Halber- 
stadt, these students cover new books, pre- 
pare magazines for study hall use, and per- 
form countless other small tasks which help 
keep the library running smoothly. A special 
service done by Carolyn Greenberg and Susan 
Brown is collecting money from NEW YORK 
TIMES subscribers. 



Creativity and originality were the mott 
the Art Club this year. The club, instri 
by Mr. Barry Levine, made plans for fid 
trips to local art studios. Special proje*3 
showed students how to paint with oils, 
blockprint, and to attempt a little sculpit) 
ing. Several demonstrations on unusual 
topics, such as on proportioning a figur 
have also been given. 



_A before B, Rebecca! 





20 



The Art Club aims for perfection in its endeavors. 



The trudging, the trailing 

Of jackets, boots, and mittens, 

Ever soggy, dripping . . . 



WINTER 




21 



< 



I. 




FRONT ROW: Patricia Poirier, Judy Trevallion, Co-Captains Jane Lashway and Rebecca Wil- 
son, Mary Magdalenski, Lois Jenkins. SECOND ROW: Manager Nancy Stowe, Jean Waskiew- 
icz, Susan Nugent, Sylvia Montague, Ellen Ames, Manager Susan Cranston. LAST ROW: 
Sheryl Smart, Eleanor Wickland, Lori Kopka, Mary Pierce. 



J.V. Girls Have A Winning Season 



The Junior Varsity girls experienced a suc- 
cessful season this year with 9 wins and 5 
losses. Their never-ending spirit coupled 
with their skills provided a well-rounded 
squad. This preparation will be utilized when 
these girls play for the varsity team in the 
future . 






Williamsburg 




Opponent 




17 


Granby 


11 




16 


Northampton 


13 




22 


Granby 


8 




19 


Amherst 


31 




14 


St. Michael's 


9 




18 


Easthampton 


15 




23 


J.F.K. 


27 




15 


Gateway 


16 


24 


St. Michael's 


19 


10 


Easthampton 


19 




19 


Hawley 


20 




19 


Northampton 


15 




18 


Hopkins 


16 




23 


Hawley 


19 




Total 




Won: 9 




Games: 14 




Lost: 5 








r 



W, 



22 



Rebecca Wilson successfully 
dribbles her way toward the 
basket. 



Williamsburg 




Opponent 


29 


Granby 




25 


33 


Northampton 




28 


30 


Granby 




26 


37 


Amherst 




40 


46 


St. Michael's 




28 


43 


Easthampton 




27 


37 


Gateway 




25 


38 


St. Michael's 




21 


25 


Easthampton 




38 


25 


Northampton 




30 ' 


41 


Hopkins 




32 


41 


Gateway 




34 


'otal 








rames: 12 




Lost 


: 3 






Won: 


9 



)NT ROW: Co-Captains Teresa Vayda and Miriam 
ves. SECOND ROW: Manager Jill Connell, Renee 
jdalenski, Priscilla LeDuc, Manager Diane Ryan. 
'.RD ROW: Susan Ingellis, Louise Norris, Joy Nietsche. 
iT ROW: Charlene LeDuc, Carlotta Rustemeyer, Gilda 
temeyer, Lynn Pomeroy. 



Success Marks Last Varsity Girls Season 



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Determination and a good defense, along 
with the spirited coaching of Mrs. Evelyn 
Kmit, brought our team in the winning 
column. Their enthusiasm to win was 
stressed in the games against Granby and 
Northampton, when the winning margin was 
only a few points. It was a successful sea- 
son for the girls with 9 wins and 3 losses. 
The season does not appear unique, but for 
the 1970-71 Varsity girls there is the satis- 
faction of remembering they were the last 
team ever to play for Williamsburg High 
School. 



Renee Magdalenski's defensive 
block stops the inside jump 
shot. 



23 



Cheerleaders 
At WHS Spark 
Spirit And 
Enthusiasm 



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FRONT ROW: Sandra Kopka, Suzanne Loud, 
Jovita Derouin. LAST ROW: Angela Derouin, 
Carla Barrett, Jean Clark, Valerie Demerski, 
Susan LaCourse, Denise Barrett. 



A time to gain, a time to lose ... No mat- 
ter what the score was, the Williamsburg 
High School cheering squad, supported by 
enthusiastic sports lovers, added life and 
spirit to this year's basketball games. The 
squad, which began practice last year under 
the direction of Mrs. George Munroe, con- 



tinued to practice old cheers as well as nei 
ones suggested by their supervisor, Mrs. 
David Grills. An additional pompon routing 
to the music of "Cosmos' Factory, " was cfl 
of this year's innovations. The squad's en u 
siastic support has indeed made WHS' la si J 
basketball season one to remember. 




Chiqui Derouin does some high stepping to "Up Around the |i 
Bend. " 




Beware of flying cheerleaders 
24 



IVHS J.V. Team Enjoys Fruitful Season 



\/' 








[Ray LaCourse's aggression in rebounding shows deter- 
mination to win. 



Due to promotions to the varsity at the start of 
the season, it appeared that the Williamsburg 
J.V. 's would experience a long, hard winter. 
However, the team combined determination 
and the skills they developed in many hours 
of practice to compile a surprising and re- 
spectable 12-8 record, including an upset vic- 
tory over a talented Southwick five. Individu- 
ally, Ray LaCourse and Tom Breen provided 
most of the firepower with help from Bob Hath- 
away. LaCourse tied the season scoring rec- 
ord with 237 points. Breen recorded 235 and 
set a new record for most field goals in a 
season with 100. With continued improvement 
many of the J.V.'s will have the opportunity 
to move up to the varsity squad which will rep- 
resent Hampshire Regional next year. 



Williamsburg 




>ponent 


39 


at Wilmington, Vt. 


15 
44 


26 


at Smith's School 


51 


Smith's School 


38 


32 


at Belchertown 


29 


45 


Granby 


56 


52 


Westfield Voke 


10 


59 


Southwick 


42 


53 


at Precious Blood 


21 


47 


at St. Mary's 


73 


63 


Holyoke Trade 


50 


36 


at Gateway 


44 


43 


Intramural All -Stars 


38 


42 


Belchertown 


30 


56 


at Westfield Voke 


36 


46 


at Granby 


54 


70 


at Southwick 


53 


71 


Precious Blood 


27 


53 


St. Mary's 


69 




at Holyoke Trade 


40 




Gateway 


49 



RONT ROW: David 
ierce, Deac Tiley,' 
pnny Church, Ray 
pCourse, Richard 
krrett, Robert 
eyes. LAST ROW: 
bach Grills, James 
bgg, Stephen Mc- 
ay, Thomas Breen, 
pbert Hathaway, 
brry La Voice, Paul 
Buver, Manager 
lharles Kirby. 





FRONT ROW: David Adair, Robert Nehrirtg, Steven Rapalee, Samuel Williston, James Taylor, 
George Childs. SECOND ROW: Coach David Grills, Philip Graves, Stanley Kajka, Manager Dav| 
Bauver, Raymond LaCourse, John Clark, and Coach Earl Tonet. 

Varsity Boys Place Fifth In Final Year 



The final basketball team to represent Williams 
burg High School enjoyed the most successful 
season in recent years. The Bantams compiled 
a highly respectable 12-9 overall record and a 
10-8 mark in the Bi-County League, good for a 
fifth place finish. The victories included a hard- 
fought victory over arch -rival Gateway and 
close ball games to St. Mary's and Granby in 
a losing cause. The team was invited to play- 
off against Lenox for a berth in the Western 
Mass. small schools tournament. 

Steve Rapalee led the team in scoring with 
420 points for a 21 point average. He was 
also the top rebounder as he hauled down 247 
caroms and Steve was picked for the All Bi- 
County League team. George Childs and Bob 
Nehring also provided the scoring punch as 
each tallied over 200 points. Childs led the 
team in foul shooting with 70 per cent, and 
Nehring led the team in field goal percentage 
with a solid 50 per cent. Other top players who 
contributed to the team's success included Sam 
Williston, Jim Taylor, Dave Adair, and John 
Clark. 



m 

40 




•' 



With everyone returning except Taylor, Willis 
ton, and Clark, and with continued improve- 
ment by current varsity subs like Phil Graves 
and Stan Kajka, the first basketball season at 
Hampshire Regional promises to be very 

product ive . Bob Nehring sneaks 

26 in for an easy score. 



\ 




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Bob Nehring fights 
for a rebound. 



Williamsburg 




Opponent 


64 


at Wilmington 


36 


69 


at Smith's School 


27 


75 


Smith's School 


41 


61 


at Belchertown 


50 


37 


Granby 


41 


49 


Westfield Voke 


30 


70 


Southwick 


90 


41 


at Precious Blood 


47 


58 


at St. Mary's 


74 


79 


Holyoke Trade 


50 


53 


at Gateway 


59 


75 


Clarke School 


32 


67 


Belchertown 


58 


67 


at Westfield Voke 


29 


55 


at Granby 


61 


70 


at Southwick 


85 


61 


Precious Blood 


47 


69 


St. Mary's 


77 


54 


at Holyoke Trade 


42 


59 


Gateway 

Western Mass 
Playoff vs Lenox 


" 


58 


at West Side 


96 



John Clark shows proper technique. 



27 




V T 



Joe Crompton and David Bauver study the intricacies of U. S. law. 



Mr. Knight lectures on accounthl 



Business Courses Develop Capabilities 



Typing class progresses from the "hunt and peck" meui 



Many students are acquiring relevant 
and useful knowledge and skills in the 
courses taught by Mrs. Bart and Mr. 
Knight in the Business Department. 
Typing is a very important skill in 
school and on a job. Consumer Educa- 
tion and Law provide a student with in- 
formation he will use every day of his 
life. Shorthand, Accounting, General 
Business, and Office Practice courses 
prepare many students to take advantage 
of employment opportunities in business 
immediately following graduation from 
high school. 




28 





Computing acid -base reactions comes easily to Dale Parsons. 



Mr. Buck completes an equation 
for his chemistry class. 



Math And Science Courses Promote Logic 




The Math Department at WHS offers 
courses to suit the needs of bfcth college - 
bound students and those who plan a ca- 
reer right after high school . Whether 
teaching Introduction to Algebra or Advanced 
Math, Mr. Cote, Mr. Southwick, and 
Mrs. Tierney strive to make the often 
difficult subject matter comprehensible 
to their pupils. The Science Department 
also provides a wide variety of courses, 
allowing students to choose from Earth 
Science, Biology, Advanced Biology, 
Applied Science, Chemistry, and Physics. 
Teaching aids such as Mr. Buck's Geiger 
counter and Mr. Munroe's human skeleton 
help make the courses interesting. 

Frederick Schumann wrestles with word 
problems. 



29 



History and government courses have a 
very important place in the curriculum of 
WHS. Serious students can become im- 
mersed in the beginnings of civilization 
in Mr. Ledgard's Ancient History class, 
the Gilded Age in United States History 
with Mr. Montebello or Mrs. Poor, or in 
the political effects of the Industrial Revo- 
lution in Mr. Tonet's Modern European 
History course. The Government class 
studies the Constitution and the workings 
of our government, while the Problems of 
Democracy classes shape their own 
course by choosing units of study on such 
problems as civil rights and the population 
explosion. 



UM 




Henry and Sam groove to Tchaikovsky's "1812 Overture" m 
Tonet's class. 



It 



Relevancy Is Seen In History Courses 



Remember the problems of eighth grade social studies? 





Mr. Montebello organizes his lecture 



30 




Jackie and Bruce's bag is NOT English grammar. 



Language Skills Improve Communication 



m 



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E 



The beginnings of the novel, the stories of 
Washington Irving, the elimination of the 
dangling participle -- all are studied at 
one time or another in English classes at 
WHS. Mrs. Halberstadt, Mrs. Packard, 
Mrs. Poor, and Mr. Stradinski teach each 
student basic skills in writing and speak- 
ing English and also introduce him to the 
worlds of American and English literature. 
In foreign language courses students ob- 
tain a strong foundation in the structure 
of the language they are studying, learn- 
ing at the same time about the culture of 
the people who speak it. Mrs. Becker's 
classes study the customs of France or 
Germany and Mrs. DeNood's classes 
learn to make an "Omelette aux fines 
herbes" while Latin students study clas- 
sic Roman architecture with Mr. Ledgard. 



I Tapes improve listening comprehension in Mrs. DeNood's 
[French classes. 



31 



National Honor 
Society Strives 
to Inform The 
Student Body 







FRONT ROW: Joseph Crompton, Michael 
Quigley, Richard Scott. SECOND ROW: Linda 
Scaparotti, Alan Everett, Susan LaCourse. 
LAST ROW: Robert Nehring, Winthrop Stone, 
Donald Otis. 



Ik. 

r 



The Williamsburg Chapter of the National 
Honor Society is founded on four principles 
-- scholarship, service, leadership, and 
character. The object of our chapter is to 
create an enthusiasm for scholarship, to 
stimulate a desire to render service, to pro- 
mote worthy leadership, and to encourage the 
development of character in all students of 
Williamsburg High School. 

The National Honor Society has been active 
this year in trying to fulfill these goals. 



Early in the fall it inducted new membeU 
rather than having the traditional spring] 
induction, and later in the year it held M 
sale to raise money for scholarships aril 
semblies. Because the members felt th; 
more could be done for the Student Body)) 
working with the Student Council, joint )i 
mittees were formed to plan assemblies 
student handbook, and a student -teacheifl 
night. The NHS hopes that its efforts to-q 
complish these goals have proven benef i 
to the students of WHS. 




T3f 



FRONT ROW: Amy Edwards, 
Diane Krug, Diane Ryan, Mar- 
garet Mo Hoy, Mary Allen. SEC- 
OND ROW: Susan Brown, Natalie 
West, Carolyn Creenberg. LAST 
ROW: Kim Dresser, David Kreps. 






32 



WHS Honors Its Outstanding Students 

ED 



|P* 




FRONT ROW: Carolyn Green- 
berg, Margaret Molloy, Amy 
Edwards, and Mary Allen. LAST 
ROW: Natalie West, Susan 
Brown, and Diane Krug. 



T evy year outstanding students at Williams - 
irg High School are rewarded for their 
jecial achievements and abilities. The 
Jven girls having the highest scholastic 
rerages intheir class arechosen for Gradu- 
lon Marshals, while students with political 
:linations may participate in the Student 
wernment Day or Model Congress. There 
^e two honors awarded to senior girls: the 
lA.R. Good Citizen Award is presented to 



the girl, who, in the opinion of the faculty 
and her fellow students, best displays the 
qualities of dependability, service, and lead- 
ership; and the Betty Crocker Homemaker of 
Tomorrow Award is given to the girl who 
achieves the highest score on a homemaker's 
test. The girl who receives the Betty Crocker 
Award is also eligible to compete with many 
other girls for the National Award. 




FRONT ROW: Diane Krug, Betty Crocker Home- 
maker of Tomorrow. SECOND ROW: Samuel Willis - 
ton, Student Government Day Representative. LAST 
ROW: Donna Russell, DAR Good Citizen. 



Students who participated in the thirty -first Annual 
Model Congress are as follows: FRONT ROW: Beth 
Brown, Linda Scaparotti, and Donna Bisbee. LAST 
ROW: Michael Quigley, Sue Brown, and Amy 
Edwards . 



33 



'•t- ,^B I at 

I 




* • * 






FRONT ROW: Robert Collins, Charles Ognibene, Linda Scaparotti, Beth Brovra, Donna Bisbee. SECOND 
ROW: James Poirier, Susan Brown, Amy Edwards, Michael Quigley. 






Debaters Discuss Pollution Control 



"That the Federal Government should es- 
tablish, finance, and administer programs 
to control air and water pollution in the 
United States." This resolution proved to 
be a very challenging one for the debating 
team this year. The experience of older 
team members, combined with new mem- 
bers' enthusiasm, and valuable assistance 
from coach Herbert Montebello, enabled 
Williamsburg to place fifth in the Connec- 
ticut Valley Debate League competition. 
The team, with a total of 14 wins and 12 
losses, showed a great deal of competence 
and skill, finishing with six other larger 
schools below it. Some of the highlights 
of the season were the negatives' defeats 
of teams in first and fourth place. 




Michael Quigley and Linda Scaparotti prepare 
their case. 



34 



The reviving, the reawakening 
Of people, thoughts, and pairing, 
Hitherto dormant, sleeping . . . 



SPRING 




35 



Woei Chin 
makes a pass 
to a team - 
mate in an 
exciting 
intramural 
game. 



Rivals Compete In Intramural Games 



Each season has its own intramural sport for 
interested students. In the fall, the sophomores 
upset the highly favored eighth grade in a cross 
country meet. The girls, who were unable to 
race in the boys' meet, held a race of their own. 
In this contest the sophomores took first place 
with the freshmen finishing a close second. 

During the winter and spring months many stu- 
dents tried their hand in basketball, wrestling 
and volleyball. The results of the intramural 
basketball season showed the Trojans, with an 
undefeated season, in first place. Volleyball and 
wrestling also provided much competition and a 
great deal of fun for all who participated. 




They're off! 



The boys wait for the signal. 




w, 



W 



ft * 



The Golf Team Has A Poor Season 



■i 



^■nkr'fc 



rTiTK^J Tj 



1 1 



u 



FRONT ROW: Tommy 
Daggett, Michael Bach- 
and. SECOND ROW: 
Brian Balise, David 
Jenkins, Ronald Matue- 
wezski, James Riggott. 
LAST ROW: Philip 
Graves, Stuart Ross, 
James Ryan, Francis 
Judd. ABSENT: Richard 
Hutchins, James Reinle. 





Francis Judd readies for a putt. 



Due to inexperience the 1970 golf team had a 
poor season, losing all of its games. Richard 
Hutchins and Ron Matuewezski led the team, 
with Jimmy Riggott, Michael Bachand, Tommy 
Daggett, David Jenkins, Deac Tiley, Jimmy 
Reinle, Phil Graves, Stuart Ross, and Fran- 
cis Judd finishing off the squad. Experience 
should help the 1971 team, under the direc- 
tion of Mr. George Munroe, as Richard Hut- 
chins is the only member to leave . 







Opponent 




Hopkins Academy 


Lost 


Southwick 


Lost 


Gateway Regional 


Lost 


at Gateway Regional 


Lost 


at Pioneer Regional 


Lost 


Smith Academy 


Lost 


at Hopkins Academy 


Lost 


at Smith Academy 


Lost 


Frontier Regional 


Lost 






37 




FRONT ROW: Henry Chapin, manager; Alan Thackeray, David Adair, Richard Barrett, Thomas Breen, 
Robert Thomas, John Dufresne, George Childs, Jeffrey Heath. LAST ROW: George Munson, Raymond 
LaCourse, James Vile, Arnold Pagani, Coach Tonet, Stanley Kajka, Tim Hurd, Charles Parsons, John 
Clark. 



The 1970 baseball season was both frustrat- 
ing and rewarding. During the first half of 
the season the Bantams compiled a dismal 
1-7 record. The second half, however, was 
completely different as the players jelled 
into an effective equad, winning 6 out of their 
last 8 games and finishing the season with a 
4 game winning streak . 

Co -Captain James Vile led the team with a 
.264 batting average while co -captain John 



Dufresne led the pitching squad with a 1. ^ 
earned run average. Dufresne's averagel 
was one of the best in the league, which l 
abled him to be selected to the Bi -County 
All -Star team. 

As the 1971 baseball season approaches, 
there is much hope and enthusiasm as th> 
baseball squad representing Williamsbur' 
H.S. for the last time prepares for a wir : 
ning season. 



\t 



Baseball Team Has Satisfying Season 




Dave Adair waits for the pitch. 




John Clark and Alan Thackeray anticipate a bunt attempt. 



38 



& 




J 



Jubilant teammates hoist John Dufresne 
upon their shoulders after his second 
straight one -hit game. 




Bob Thomas signals the runner 
to hold. 















BASEBALL 1970 


















PLAYER 


SB 


AB 


Runs 


Hits RBI 


AVE 


PO 


A 


E 


HP 


BB 


K 


SAC 


HR 






Adair 


3 


51 


10 


12 


12 


.235 


9 


8 


5 





16 


13 





2 






Breen 


2 


51 


5 


9 


7 


.176 


5 


12 


6 





13 


13 












Childs 


1 


59 


9 


15 


7 


.254 


19 


23 


8 





4 


18 





1 






Clark 


2 


44 


10 


9 


2 


.205 


90 


4 


8 


1 


18 


6 












Dufresne 


7 


40 


14 


6 


8 


.150 


13 


19 


5 


1 


17 


17 


2 









Heath 

















.000 





1 
























Hurd 





11 


1 


2 


1 


.182 


2 


1 


1 





1 


6 












Kajka 


1 


3 


1 


1 





.333 











1 





2 












LaCourse 


1 


3 


1 








.000 














1 


3 












Pagani 





25 


1 


4 


3 


.160 


1 


3 


2 





1 


3 












Parsons 





35 


• 5 


5 


6 


.143 


131 


12 


12 


3 


10 


16 


1 









Thackeray 


5 


55 


11 


13 


10 


.236 


23 


27 10 





9 


7 












Thomas 





15 


7 


1 


2 


.061 


11 


5 


2 





12 


8 












Vile 


15 


53 


11 


14 


7 


.264 


11 


3 


1 


2 


8 


7 












Totals 


37 


435 


83 


81 


66 


.186 


379 


115 60 


8 


101 


118 


4 


3 






Pitchers 




IP 


Runs 


Hits 


BB 


K 


no hitters 


w -- 


LA 


ER 


ERA 


Won 


Lost 


Adair 




25 


14 




24 


16 


24 









.666 




11 


3.08 


2 


1 


Dufresne 




59 


31 




37 


28 


81 









.444 




14 


1.66 


4 


5 


Pagani 




26 


15 




20 


18 


35 









.250 




7 


1.88 


1 


3 


TOTALS 




96 


53 




74 


52 


140 









.438 




32 


2.33 

Won 
Lost 


7 

7 
9 


9 



**«l 



FRONT ROW: Jill Connell, 
Rebecca Wilson, Renee Mag- 
dalinski, Lynn Pomeroy, Lois 
Jenkins, Jill Montague. SEC- 
OND ROW: June Anderson, 
Mary Brisbois, Susan Ingellis, 
Manager Susan Cranston, Car- 
lotta Rustemeyer, Louise Nor- 
ris, Nancy Turner, Beverly Par- 
sons, Sherry Smart. LAST 
ROW: Manager Diane Ryan, 
Sandy Kopka, Jane Lashway, 
Miriam Graves, Jean Clark, 
Sylvia Montague, Dale Lannon. 




Softball Team Finishes With 6-4 Record 



- 







SOFTBALL 1970 




Will 
9 


iamsburg Opponent 
Amherst 18 


12 

19 

18 

4 


Northampton 
Gateway 
Gateway 
Amherst 


6 
14 

11 

10 


8 


Southwick 


12 


28 


Belchertown 


17 


18 
10 


Northampton 
Southwick 


17 
13 


19 


Belchertown 


5 



This year's co-captains Jill Connell and Jean Clark 
demonstrate proper catching and hitting techniques. 



The girls Softball team had a very good 
season, winning 6 out of 10 games. Many 
long hours, under the able supervision of 
Mrs. Evelyn Kmit, were spent in prac- 
ticing for the games. Although they lost 
several good players, the girls played 
with much vigor and enthusiasm to finish 
a successful season. 



40 



Students Visit "La Belle France 



?? 







Two of the highlights of the tour were the Eiffel Tower 
and the Arc de Triomphe. 




Mr. Mazzadra and Jane Hathaway test their talent as wine 
connoisseurs. 



41 



FRONT ROW: Cheryl Ferron, 
Linda Goralski, Diane Krug, 
Susan Brown, Elizabeth Papa - 
george, Linda Richard. SEC- 
OND ROW: Penny Fournier, 
Doreen Bigelow, Patricia 
Waskiewicz, Cindie Bramen, 
Linda Scaparotti, Elizabeth 
Riggott. THIRD ROW: Mary 
Beth Kellogg, Patricia Mc- 
Gill, Elaine Gugenberger, 
Donna Inman, Joyce Fogg, 
Julie Bigelow, Bonnie Crans- 
ton. LAST ROW: Amy Ed- 
wards, Connie Bissell, Betsy 
Everett, Beth Brown, Henry 
Chapin, Kim Dresser. 



^ 



>*<, 



f *w 



J 






\ 







/ 



i& , A ' to i 



s.h i k- • 



The Mikado Is A Colorful Success 



Brightly -colored kimonos, waving fans, a 
threadbare and lovestruck minstrel -- all 
these added color and life to THE MIKADO, 
the chorus' spring 1970 musical offering. 
With the colorful Japanese scenery and the 
complex but humorous plot, this Gilbert and 
Sullivan production proved to be another 
success for the WHS performers. 



Since the operetta, the chorus, under thel 
rection of Mrs. Esther Norris, has also I 
performed between acts at the plays and I 
the Christmas assembly. As a finale to tl 
musical contribution to WHS, the chorus I 
will present THE RED MILL, the humorc| 
story of two Americans in Holland in the 
early 1900's, later this spring. 




To save his life Ko-Ko pleads for the hand of the 
exotic Katicha. 



Pitti-Sing and Peep-Bo help Yum-Yum prepare 
for her wedding day. 




Leads of the Mikado 
were Diane Krug as 
Yum -Yum , Myron 
Clapp as Nanki-Pooh, 
Betsy Feiker as Katisha, 
Kim Dresser as Ko-Ko, 
and James Riggott as 
Pooh-Bah. 



»S 



Unusual occurrences in Titipu arouse the Mikado's curiosity. 



r 



Yum -Yum sings of her love for Nanki-Pooh. 






r 



The 1970 
Junior-Senior 
Prom Was an 
Overwhelming 

Success 




Sylvia Shea, Diane Krug, Debra Cranston, Mary Brisbois, and Diane y 



"Nights in White Satin" provided a ro- 
mantic theme for the 1970 Junior-Senior 
Prom. Excellent food and sweet music 
were enjoyed by all who attended. May 
22 was the date on which Debra Cranston 
was chosen Queen with Mary Brisbois, 
Diane Krug, Diane Ryan, and Sylvia 
Shea as her court. The Colonial Hilton 
provided a time to love, a time to laugh, 
and a time to dance . 




Lynn and Mary enjoy the peaceful atmosphere. 



44 




"Tim to Eat!" 



jerones enjoying themselves 
ie Prom included Mr. and 




Tommy and Margaret wait for the music to begin. 



45 



The tutoring program has expanded this year 
to a point where every reasonably quiet nook 
in the school is occupied with couples val- 
iantly struggling with anything from Latin 
verbs to algebra problems. Almost any tutor 
or tutee will agree that the results of this 
program are highly satisfying. Even if 
grades don't improve noticeably, much is 
always gained by two people working with 
and learning from each other. 



1 






Mr. Feiker discusses teaching methods with tutor 
Jovita Derouin, John Norris, and Susan Ethier. 



Many Participate In Tutoring Program 





Sue Brown and Michael Quigley help their tutees, 
Tommy Tear and Harry Weit, with difficult math 
problems. 



»/■ 



Ruthie Bisbee gains helpful suggestions from her 
tutee's French teacher, Mrs. DeNood. 



46 



I The reaching, the reaping 

Of knowledge, thoughts, ideas, 

Always groping, learning . . . 



CLASSES 








MR. EARL TONET -- Vice -Principal 



MR. JOSEPH ZALOT -- Principal 

The Administration Works For Students 



The educational philosophy of Williamsburg 
High School can be summed up in these words: 
"We believe that we should recognize the 
dignity and worth of each student as he de- 
velops to his fullest potential ..." The ad- 
ministration has constantly endeavored to 
follow this philosophy to its fullest extent. The 
interest and dedication of the administration 
has proven invaluable to the student, and the 
past year truly has been one for all to remem- 
ber in the years to come. 



II 



• • 




MRS. ANNEGRAV; 
Secretary 



MRS. DORIS GRALA 
Secretary 







r 4 



GUIDANCE DIRECTOR, MR. GEORGE FEIKE 
and his aide, MRS. AUDREY POMEROY. 



Faculty Plans For Hampshire Regional 





DAVID ASHENDEN 
ice 



MRS. ELEANOR BART 
Business Subjects; Dra- 
matics Business Adviser. 



The faculty members of Williamsburg High 
School have worked hard this year with and 
for the students. Not only have they brought 
a high quality of education to Williamsburg 

High's last year, but they have worked to in- 
sure an even higher degree of quality in educa 
tion at Hampshire Regional. The faculty was 
instrumental in expressing ideas for new 
courses in the opening year at Hampshire 
Regional. Meetings were held once a month 
to decide the curriculum, with the teachers 
giving up much of their valuable time. In 
extracurricular activities, they have spent 
long hours of their own time with students . 
For all these accomplishments the faculty 
deserves a big "Thank You." 





S. JUDITH BECKER 
Ich; German 



MR. CHARLES BUCK 
Science; National Honor 
Society Adviser. 





5. HILDA DENOOD 
ich; Tattler Assistant 
Wiser. 



MISS MARTHA 
DICKERMAN 
Social Studies; Student 
Newspaper Adviser. 





MR. RONALD COTE 
Mathematics. 



MRS. ANNA CURTIS 
English; Dramatics Adviser. 




49 



MR. BARRY LEVINE -■ 
Art Teacher 






MR. DAVID GRILLS 


MRS. MARGARET 


MRS. FRANCES 


MRS. EVELYN KM] 


Physical Education; J.V. 


HALBERSTADT 


HUTCHINSON 


Physical Education; 


Basketball; Cross Country; 


English; Librarian; Dra- 


Reading. 


ball; Softball. 


Track. 


matics Adviser. 







Our Faculty Uses Ingenui 






MR. PAUL KNIGHT 
Business Subjects; Dra- 
matics Technical Adviser; 
Tattler Business Adviser. 





MR. PETER KOSTi 
Science; Mathemat'd 




MR. HARRY LEDGARD 
Latin; Ancient History. 



MRS. JANE MARX 
Adjustment Counse 



MRS. ESTHER NORRIS -- 
Director of the Chorus 



50 







1. HERBERT 
| MONTEBELLO 
Rial Studies; Debate 
lich. 



MR. GEORGE MUNROE 
Science; Debate Judge; 
Golf Coach. 



MRS. MARIE PACKARD 
English; Tattler Adviser. 



MRS. SUSAN POOR 
Social Studies; English. 



And Out Of The Classroom 





P.DAVID SOUTHWICK 
ematics; Science; 
nt Council Adviser. 




MR. PETER 

ST RAD IN SKI 
English; Dramatics 
Adviser. 





IS. JUNETIERNEY 
Hithematics 



MR. EARL TONET 
Social Studies; Basketball; 
Baseball. 



MR. GERARD PATENAUDE 
Custodian. 



51 




Grade Seven Strife 




Mary Smart and Lisa Suchecki exhibit a 
moment of solemnity. 



FRONT ROW: Susan Barbeau, Kim Ducharme, Cheryl Cote, 
Deborah Heath. SECOND ROW: Tina Davis, Bonnie Cranston, 
Kathy Inman, Sandra Cross. THIRD ROW: Donna Carpenter, 
Cheryl Braman, Penny Fournier, Mona Karkut. FOURTH ROW: 
David Hale, Edward Ames, Stephen Heath, Christopher Duval, 
C indie Braman, Tammy Johnson. FIFTH ROW: Robert Gardner, 
James Anderson, Robert Gover, Jerry Culver. SIXTH ROW: 
Joseph Connell, Timothy Gulow, Peter Beebe, Stephen Demer- 
ski. SEVENTH ROW: James Culver, Michael Fisher, Philip 
Delisle, David Brown, Donald Eddy. LAST ROW: Robert Bacon. 
Absent: Doreen Bigelow, John Ducharme. 



Erin O'Brien is lost in creativity. 



Doreen Bigelow and Mary Beth Kellogg make an in- 
teresting picture. 





FRONT ROW: Mary Beth Kellogg, Alice Viliesis, Lila Valone, Debra Lulek, Melody Roberge, Susan Scott, 
Patricia Waskiewicz, Ruth Sylvester, Catherine Lewis, Barbara Loud. SECOND ROW: Terri Sylvia, Mary Smart, 
Susan Karowski, Stephen Pierce, Michael LaCasse, Michael Kirby, Lawrence Sullivan, James Papillon, Robert 
MacDonald, Erin O'Brien, Lisa Suchecki. LAST ROW: Michael Richardson, Robert Lentner, David Nichols, 
Thomas Tear, William Tobin, Nicholas Papageorge, Frederick Schumann, Randy La Valley, Mark Stevens, 
John LaFleur. 



53 




What's so funny, Peter? 




Denise Fournier and Sandra Golash prepare themselves for another lesson. 



Grade Eight Is Active In School Events 




FRONT ROW: Thomas Berryhill, Deborah Buzzee, Laura Avery, Tiani English, Penelope Boynton, 
Sandra Golash, Diane Blakesley, Susan Ducharme, Cindy Foster, Wendy Emerson, Denise Fournier, 
Thomas Daggett. SECOND ROW: Joyce Fogg, Donald Fox, Gilbert Bigelow, William Collins, Royal 
Eddy, Michael Bachand, Oren Clark, Paul Bauver, William Gardner, David Bisbee, Kathy Brown. 
LAST ROW: Theodore Derouin, Edward Childs, Daniel Fisher, Everett Fuller, Leonard Cranston, Jay 
Delisle, Robert Bazluke, Brian Balise, Lawrence Barbeau, Charles Anthony. Absent: Peter Allen. 



54 





Karl Wickland comtemplates his 
after-school freedom. 



FBNT ROW: Judy LaCourse, Sheila Ingellis, Arnelda Gover, Mary Jen- 
E. SECOND ROW: Judy Kellogg, Kathleen Kirby, Patricia McGill, 
Kaileen Marvin. THIRD ROW: Donna Inman, Elaine Gugenberger, 
Daid Hayes. FOURTH ROW: Dennis Kelly, Martin Kellogg. FIFTH ROW: 
Stihen Liimatainen, Kenneth LaFond, Gary Hathaway. SIXTH ROW: 
jijor Ingellis, Christopher Gulow, Brian LaCombe, John Mongeau. 
SEENTH ROW: Donald King, Gregory Linscott. LAST ROW: James Hall, 
Esrt Keyes. Absent: Deborah Kolosewicz, Gilbert Loud. 




FRONT ROW: Patricia Poirier, 
Christine Scott, Robin Worsnop, 
Laura Rickey, Jean Waskiewicz, 
Jennifer Stevens, Mary Todd, 
Judy Trevallion, Deborah Tir- 
rell, Jo-Anna Ross, Mary Ann 
Wilson. SECOND ROW: Charles 
Warner, Toby Rice, Robert 
Pierce, John Papillon, Robert 
Thouin, Thomas Seymour, Karl 
Wickland, Robert Smart, 
Charles Ognibene. THIRD ROW: 
Mary Pierce, George Swining- 
ton, William Turner, Kim 
Snyder, Kenneth Parsons, Peter 
Stone, Harry Weit, Theodore 
Pierce, Mark Whitney, Phyllis 
Norris. Absent: Kevin O'Brien. 



55 




FRONT ROW: Rebecca Greenberg, Dawn Chevalier, Tina Geary, Marion Chamberlain, Deborah Dewey, 
Ellen Ames, Cheryl Ferron, Donna Bisbee, Ruth Brown. SECOND ROW: Diane Goralski, Elizabeth Brown, 
Fern Carver, Vicki Finch, Valerie Demerski, Denise Barrett, Cindy Childs, Betsy Everett, James Fogg. 
LAST ROW: Gordon Bradley, Joseph Adams, Edward Fisher, Dennis Bacon, Lenny Church, Joel Estes, 
Robert Fuller, Thomas Breen, Cary Crossman. Absent: Brian Buffum, Nancy Crompton. 



It's A Busy Year For Freshmen 








The camera easily diverts Alan Kel- 
logg's attention. 



Freshman Class officers are Betsy Everett, Beth Brown, Robert Hathawa 
Rebecca Greenberg, and Cindy Childs. 



56 




■ 




Nancy Crompton bows her head 
in meditation. 






Judy Peterson utilizes the power 
of communication. 





FRONT ROW: Karen Healy, Sharon Guzik, Mary Greene, Lois Jen- 
kins. SECOND ROW: Debbie Higgins, Ann Ingellis, Cheryl Lannon. 
THIRD ROW: Donna Herrmann, Deborah Krug, Lynne LaCasse. 
FOURTH ROW: Lori Kopka, Gary La Valley, Donald Koslow. FIFTH 
ROW: Scott Healy, Dana LaCombe, Alan Kellogg. SIXTH ROW: 
Michael Hathaway, Larry LaVoice, Randy LaCasse, Jeffrey Kellogg. 
SEVENTH ROW: Robert Hathaway. LAST ROW: Raymond LaCourse, 
Daryl Finch, David Johnson. Absent: David Hamilton, Ann Marie 
Kroll. 



Lori Kopka and Robert Hathaway speak out in class. 




57 



\ 












\ 




FRONT ROW: Janet Paradee, Terry Wolfe, Dona Sylvester, Rebecca McKay, Cynthia Lawton, Marianne 
Watling, Judy LeBeau, Bonnie Warriner, Sheryl Smart, Patricia Thouin, Kathleen Sylvester, Judy Peterson, 
Jill Montague, Sylvia Montague, Linda Richard, Mary Magdalenski. SECOND ROW: Gretchen Schumann, 
Michael Wilson, Stephen McKay, Timothy Browne, Francis Pierce, Mark Warner, Lee Stewart, Ernest Smith, 
Daniel Montague, Nancy Pash. LAST ROW: James Warner, Donald Turner, James Ryan, Gordon Bass, Ed- 
ward Parsons, Russell Richardson, Paul Zononi, David Tirrell, Daniel Nehring. Absent: Kenneth Eddy, Dana 
Helems, Ronald Matuewezski, Jodie Scott. 




Jill Montague and Dan Montague 
take good notes in Latin class. 



How about sharing it with us, girls? 



58 



r« 





Robert Collins finally masters the keyboard. 



Sophomore Class officers are Denise Riggott, 
Nancy Stowe, Renee Magdalenski, and Philip 
Skwira . 



Sophomores Show Spirit /W3 




FRONT ROW: Clair Blanchet, Constance Bissell, June Anderson, Lynn Crossman, Julia Bigelow, 
Dianne Chapin, Diana King, Dale Lannon, Brenda Buzzee, Susan Kolosewicz. SECOND ROW: Jane 
Keyes, Karen Karowski, Angela Derouin, Melodie Cone, Carla Anthony, Susan Brown, Jane Lash- 
way, Sandra Kopka, Patricia Avery. LAST ROW: Robert Collins, Charles Kirby, Robert Edwards, 
Richard Barrett, Elliot Davidson, David Jenkins, Thomas Connell, David Elmes, Jeffery Heath. 
Absent: Sara Brown, Pamela Delisle, Dennis Dextraze, Karen Kroll. 



59 




'h 



Richard Barrett shows his more 
serious side. 



4. 








Only three days 'til book reports, 
Eugene. 




h C j}l Sof^ One 



FRONT ROW: Elizabeth Riggott, Rebecca 
Wilson, Denise Riggott. SECOND ROW: l)U 
Pomeroy, June Pelky, Nancy Stowe. THIR 
ROW: Kathleen Lockwood, Debra Lawton, 
Wendy Roberge. FOURTH ROW: Susan Nu- 
Diane LaValle, Renee Magdalenski, KathJ 
Witherell. FIFTH ROW: LeAnn Parsons, 
Maureen O'Brien, Lynn Stewart. SIXTH RC 
Eleanor Wickland, Eileen Wright, Judy Ro 
SEVENTH ROW: George Munson, David 
Pierce, Harold Rindge. LAST ROW: Philip 
Skwira, James Loomis, Eugene La Valley, 
Steven Rapalee. Absent: April Mercier, 
Paul Mock, Dorothy Packard, Marlene Spo 
bert, Edward Trevallion. 




6 



. 



* 



Juniors Lead An Exciting Existence 




NT ROW: Patrice Brown, 
In Kirby, Marlene Anderson. 
I)ND ROW: Wendy Chick, 
ji Goralski, Susan Ingellis, 
Inda Emerson. THIRD ROW: 
[1 Ethier, Jean Clark, Jovita 

lin. FOURTH ROW: Susan 
feton, Ruth Bisbee, Carolyn 
I. FIFTH ROW: Joseph 
Jipton, Miriam Graves, 
lira Barbeau, Deborah Beebe. 
|H ROW: Philip Graves, John 

, Richard Durant. LAST 
Herbert Childs, Stanley 
la, Francis Judd, George 
Js. Absent: David Adair, 
ICernak, Mark Harry, Woei 



kard Scott prepares to voice 
bpinion. 



^■^■■■i 



? 




I 



|mior class officers are Tracey 
Utnam, Richard Scott, Janet 
Jven and Patrice Brown. 








»•: 


fi --/£ %^:CC "L 


IB 





,8t 



FRONT ROW: Donna Thouin, Susan LaCourse, Elizabeth Papageorge, Debra Snape, Gilda Rustemeyer, 
Suzanne Loud, Tracey Putnam, Carlotta Rustemeyer, Janet Loven, Brenda Sylvester, Anne Zononi, 
Linda Scaparotti, Priscilla LeDuc, Janet Wolff, Robin LaFlam. SECOND ROW: Merrill-Lyn Witherell, 
Joyc e Kirk, James Riggott, Barry Richardson, Michael Quigley, Richard Scott, Mark Wilson, Louise 
Norris, Deborah Richard. LAST ROW: Winthrop Stone, John Norris, Benjamin Willcutt, Donald Otis, 
Stuart Ross, Christopher Watling, Robert Nehring, Dale Parsons, Robert Turner. Absent: Michael 
Kolosewicz. 




Norma Sarafin 
and George 
Childs realize 
concentration is 
the key to the 
future . 




Joseph Crompton considers the evidence in 
a case. 




62 



The shaping, the shining 

Of optimism, hopes, and planning, 

Getting ready, preparing . . . 



SENIORS 







63 



Sixty-two Graduate This Year 






MARY CECELIA ALLEN 
Chorus lj Tutor 3; Art Club 4; 
National Honor Society 3,4. 



PAUL EDWARD BACON 



CARLA JEAN BARRETT 
Cheerleader 1, 2, 3, 4; Treasul 
2; Tattler Typing Coordinate | 
4; Prom Committee 3; Intra- 1 
mural Sports 2, 3,4. 






DAVID BREED BAUVER 
Cross Country 1,2,3, Co- 
Captain 4; Basketball Manager 
2,3,4; Baseball Manager 2; 
Intramural Sports 1,2,3,4; 
Tattler Boys Sports Editor 4. 



DALE LANDON BEALS 
Cross Country 1, 2, 3, 4; Intra- 
mural Sports 1. 



SALLY ANN BEALS 
Basketball 1; Softball 1. 



64 





MARY ANN BRISBOIS 
Dramatics Staff 1,2,3,4; Soft- 
ball 2, 3; Intramural Sports 1; 
Tattler Staff 4; Prom Commit- 
tee 3; Gym Aide 3. 



Honored for NMSQT performance: Amy 
Edwards, Carolyn Greenberg, and 
Margaret Molloy. 






5 SAN ELIZABETH BROWN 
I>rary Aide 1, 2, 3,4; Chorus 
K, 3,4; Musical 1, 2,3,4; 
Jjbating 3,4; Model Congress 
ii; Student Council 3; Tattler 
Jiff 4; Latin Banquet 2; 
fjtional Honor Society 3,4; 
lunatics 3,4; Dramatics 
idi 2; Intramural Sports 2, 3,4; 
F)m Committee 3; Tutor 4. 



BRUCE MANNING BUFFUM 



WAYNE ALAN CERNAK 



This page is made possible through the courtesy of GRAVES EQUIPMENT, INC. 





HENRY THAYER CHAPIN JR 
Baseball Manager 1, 2, 3,4; 
Historian 3; Student Council -| 
Tattler Staff 4; Chorus 4; Gyr 
Aide 4; Intramural Sports 2, 3 
4; Prom Committee 3; Music; 
4. 



Our class officers are Teresa Vayda, Phillip Tirrell, Charlene LeDuc, 
Thomas Mosher, and Jane Hathaway. 






JOHN EDWIN CLARK 
Baseball 1, 2, 3, Captain 4; 
Basketball 2, 3, 4; Cross Country 
3,4; Student Guide 3. 



STEVEN ELLIS CLARK 
Basketball Manager 3; Cross 
Country 1,2,3,4; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2, 3, 4. 



JILLCONNELL 
Basketball Manager 1,2,3,4; 
Cross Country Manager 4; Soft 
ball 1, 2, 3, Co-Captain 4; In-; 
tramural Sports 1, 2, 3,4; Lath; 
Banquet 2. 



66 



I 






RUSSELL EARL CULVER 
Gym Aide 3 



LINDSEY LEE DELISLE 



JEANNE SUE DODGE 
Tattler Staff 4. 



Seniors Are Thinkers And Doers 







<IM JAY DRESSER 

Dramatics 3,4; Dramatics Staff 
2; Chorus 3, 4; Musical 2, 3, 4; 
(Science Club 2; National Honor 
•Society 3,4; Vice President 3; 
intramural Sports 2,3,4; Latin 
Banquet 2; Prom Committee 3. 



Henry Chapin and Diane Ryan 
strive to improve their typing. 





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I 



AMY LOUISE EDWARDS 
Debating 1, 2, 3, 4; Model Congi 
1, 2, 3,4; Library Aide 2; Treas I 
1, 3; Dramatics Staff 2, 3,4; La 
Banquet 3; Tattler Editor 4; Stx j 
dent Council 4; Chorus 1 , 2, 3, < i 
Musical 1, 2, 3, 4; Gazette Yout i 
Page 3; Prom Committee 3; 
National Honor Society 3, 4; In i 
tramural Sports 1, 2, 3,4; Schoci 
Newspaper 4; Tutor 3, 4. 



Diane Krug experiences a rare moment of quiet and concentration in English 
|h class. 






MARK PACKARD ELDRED 
Audio-Visual Aide 1, 2, 3; Office 
Runner 3,4; Intramural Sports 4; 
Tattler Staff 4. 



ALAN HENRY EVERETT 
Audio-Visual Aide 1 ; Intramural 
Sports 3,4; Dramatics Staff 3,4. 



JAMES ALBERT FERRON 
Audio-Visual Aide 1,2,3,4; 
Student Guide 3; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2, 3, 4. 



This page is made possible through the courtesy of THE AMERICAN YEARBOOK COMPANY 






4ERRY ELIZABETH FROST 
)ramatics Staff 1, 2, 3,4. 



CAROLYN RUTH GREENBERG 
Library Aide 1,2,3,4; Chorus 1; 
Dramatics 4; Dramatics Staff 3; 
Tattler Assistant Editor 4; National 
Honor Society 3,4; Intramural 
Sports 2, 3, 4. 



JANE MARIE HATHAWAY 
Cheerleader 1; Art Club 4; Vice 
President 4; Intramural Sports 2; 
Tutor 4. 



All Work And No Play . . . 



•I 





jfEVEN MORRIS HEALY 
ross Country 2; Gym Aide 3; 
; tramural Sports 1, 2, 3, 4. 



CAROL ANN HEBERT 
Tattler Staff 4. 






Our Fearless Leader directs the 
class to new heights. 




ELIZABETH ANN HILTON 




TIMOTHY ALDRICH HURD 
Audio-Visual Aide 1, 2, 3; Base- 
ball 2, 3, 4; Student Guide 3; 
Chess Club 2, 3; Intramural Sports 
3. 




JOHN DOUGLAS JOHNSOh 



Seniors Are Unique And Unequaled 

■ 




MARYANN ELIZABETH 

KAROWSKI 
Dramatics 2; Dramatics Staff 3; 
Tattler Staff 4; Analect Staff 2; 
Intramural Sports 3. 




NINA EILEEN KOROWSKI 
Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3,4; 
Tattler Staff 4; Latin Banquet 2; 
Art Club 4. 



70 






LAUREN ALICE KOSLOW 
Tattler Staff 4. 



DAVID LEE KREPS 
Audio-Visual Aide 1; Cross 
Country 3; Intramural Sports 1, 
2,3,4. 



DIANE EDITH KRUG 
Chorus 1, 2, 3, 4; Musical 1, 2, 3, 
4; Gym Aide 3, 4; Latin Banquet 
2; National Honor Society 3,4; 
Prom Committee 3; Tattler Staff 
4; Intramural Sports 3,4. 



"I 





DIANE JOAN LANNON 
Analect Staff 1,2; Tattler Staff 
4; Intramural Sports 1, 2, 3. 



CHARLENE FRANCES LEDUC 
Basketball 1, 2, 3,4; Treasurer 
4; Latin Banquet 2; Tattler Girls 
Sports Editor 4; Intramural Sports 
2,3,4. 



David Bauver tanks up. 



There's A Time For Every Purpose 






BRENDA ALICIA McMAHON 



MARGARET MAE MOLLOY 
National Honor Society 3, 4; 
Debating 1; Gazette Youth Page 
3; Analect Staff 2; Pep Club 2; 
Dramatics 2; Dramatics Staff 3, 
4; Tutor 3; Tattler Business 
Manager 4; School Newspaper 4. 



THOMAS WILLIAM MOSHER 
Analect Staff 2; National Honoi 
Society 3,4; Tattler Picture Co 
ordinator 4; Historian 4; Tutor 
4. 






DONALD HARVEY MUNSON 
Cross Country 2, Co-Captain 3, 
Captain 4; Track 3,4; Intramural 
Sports 2, 3, 4. 



JOY ELIZABETH NIETSCHE 
Basketball 1,2,3,4; Intramural 
Sports 1, 4; Tattler Staff 4. 



STEVEN EARL PARSONS 
Science Club 1; Intramural 
Sports 3. 



This page is made possible through the courtesy of the CLASS OF 1971 





BARBARA MAE PELISSIER 




LINDA SUSAN RHOADES 
Tattler Staff 4. 





Watch out for those sneaky se- 
niors, Mr. Kostek! 









DONNA ROSE RUSSELL 
Chorus 2, 3; Student Council 4; 
Tattler Staff 4; Intramural Sports 
2, 3, 4; Latin Banquet 2; Musical 
2,3. 



DIANE ELIZABETH RYAN 
Basketball Manager 2, 3,4; Chorus 
2 j Softball Manager 2, 3, 4; 
National Honor Society 3, 4; 
Film Club 2; Analect Staff 2; 
Intramural Sports 2, 3, 4; Tattler 
Staff 4; Prom Committee 3. 



ROBERT LESTER SHAW 
Latin Banquet 2. 



sel 



it; 



D 



Outside Interests Predominate 





DAVID FREDERICK SHEA 
Dramatics 2; Dramatics Staff 2 
Science Club 1; Chess Club 1; 
Chorus 1; Musical 1, 2, 3. 



Jill Connell and Donald Munson 
share mutual interests after lunch. 






*s^n to 



MES LESLIE TAYLOR 
seball Manager 1; Basketball 
3,4, Manager 1; President 1; 
[storian 2; Cross Country 1, 2, 3, 
Dramatics Staff 1 ; Student 
fjuncil 1,2; Gym Aide 4; Stu- 
nt Guide 3; Intramural Sports 
2,3,4; Tattler Staff 4. 





\ 



Watch that ball, Alan! 






.LAN THOMAS THACKERAY 
•aseball 1, 2, 3, Co-Captain 4; 
ntramural Sports 1,2,3,4. 



ROBERT JOEL THOMAS 
Baseball 1, 2, 3,4; Basketball 1; 
Cross Country 1; Student Guide 
3. 



PHILIP JOHN TIRRELL SR. 
Audio- Visual Aide 1; Basketball 
Manager 1,2; President 2,3,4; 
Chorus 2; Student Guide 3; In- 
tramural Sports 1, 2, 3. 



This page is made possible through the courtesy of LORING STUDIOS 





TERESA MAGDALENA VAYDA 
Basketball 1,2,3, Co-Captain 4; 
Secretary 1, 2, 3,4; Dramatics 
Staff 1,2,3,4; Softball 1,2; 
Prom Committee 3; Gym Aide 
3,4; Latin Banquet 2; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Tattler Staff 4. 



HARRY WHITING WARNER III 
Vice President 1; Cross Country 
1, 2, 3, 4; Student Council 2, 3, 4; 
Track 2, 3,4. 






JEFFREY DAVID WHITE 
Baseball 1, 2. 



SAMUEL ROBERT WILLI ST ON 
Basketball 1, 2, 3,4; Vice Presi- 
dent 2; Cross Country 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Dramatics Staff 2, 3; Student 
Council 1,2,3, President 4; 
Chess Club 1; Student Guide 3; 
Latin Banquet 2; Intramural 
Sports 1, 2, 3, 4; Tattler Staff 4; 
Student Government Day Repre- 
sentative 4. 



NATALIE JOYCE WEST 
Chorus 2; Film Club 1, 2; Na 
tional Honor Society 3, 4; A 
lect Staff 2; Drug Workshop 3; 
Pep Club 2. 



OTHER MEMBERS OF THE CL 

ANN ELIZABETH BROWN 
Student Council 3; Tattler 
Staff 4. 

ALAN DAVID ESTES 
Cross Country 2, 3, 4; 
Science Club 1. 

MICHAEL RICHARD SEYMOUI 
Cross Country 1", 2. 

JACQUELINE RUTH WEBB 
Art Club 3. 



76 






Ml 



f 



*^P**X>1 



What was the year 1971? To us, the students of Williamsburg High 
School, it was the time to fulfill the purposes that we, as indi- 
viduals, felt were most important. This yearbook is an account of 
those desires: a record of our intellectual efforts in classes, our 
spirited determination in athletic competition, and our creative 
ability in extracurricular activities such as the newspaper, art 
club, and tutoring. Each of these interests, whether intellectual, 
athletic, or social, has taken us one step closer to discovering 
ourselves and our purposes in life. The striving for these goals, 
whether successful or not, has indeed made 1971 an exciting and 
memorable year . 



77 



Ads 



f* 



GOSHEN 
**Ghet's Garage 
The Country Plate 
*Duensser Decorative 
Metals 
**Goshen Rupp Sales 
Hillwood Gift Shop 
*J. & L. Sales 
*Log Cabin Motel 
Pierce's General Store 
Tilton Fruit Farm 
Whale Inn 
Whispering Pines 
Antiques 



WILLIAMSBURG 
*Bray's Service Station 

Charlene's Soda Shop 

Cichy's Garage 

Classic Coiffures 

Jean's Colonial 

Cleaners 
*F. N. Graves & Son 

Hemenway Insurance 
*Lashway Lumber 

Len's Fine Foods 

The Lunch Box 

Nehring's Alterations 

Pat's Package Store 
*E. M. Rice & Son 

Smart Beauty Salon 
*Strout Realty 
Thomas' Barber Shop 
Twin Cedar Nursery 
*Williamsburg Fuel 
Company 

Williamsburg Snack Bar 



HAYDENVILLE 
Adair's Variety & 

Market 
Champ's Beauty Salon 
Chuck's Radio & T.V. 
Colonial Manor Rest 

Home Inc. 
Delisle's Auto Body 
Demerski Real Estate 
The Ferrante Company 
Haydenville Package 

Store 
**Haydenville Savings 

Bank 
Hillside Orchards 
Ida's Hair Styling 
**Mansfield Funeral 

Home 
McAllister's Sunoco 

Service 
Noble Manufacturing Co ) 

Inc. 
E. Whitney, Florist 
Williamsburg Country Cj^ 




CHESTERFIELD 
Bisbee Brothers 

Lumber & Building 

Materials 
*Blue Ridge Farm 
C. & D. Masonry 
Elmbrook Farm 
Healy's Garage 
Hinton's Auto Body 
Joe's Vegetables 
Stan's Vegetables 
Yankee Trader 



♦Contributed $10 

♦♦Contributed $15 

♦♦♦Contributed $25 



ORTHAMPTON 
gway, Inc. 
am August 
. & E . Roofing 

Company 
aeon G.M.C. Inc. 
ak's Citgo 
on Marche 
andle's Pharmacy, 
Inc. 
ahill & Hodges 
[ientral Bus Terminal 
j^esco Mfg. Corp. 
I. L. Childs & Son 
lollege Towne Shops 

Inc. 
:onrad's Gulf 
Copies Unlimited 
I . J. Croteau Hardware 

Co. 
)aily Hampshire 

Gazette 
larry Daniels, Inc. 

Del Padre Music Shop, 

Inc. 
Walter E. Denny, 

Optician 



Charles R. Dutton 

Funeral Home 
E. & J. Cigar Co., 

Inc. 
Fine's Men's Store 
Foster - Farrar Co. 
Fred's Esso 
*Gazette Printing Co . , 

Inc. 
Gould Furniture 

Company 
Grandma's Attic 
***Graves Equipment, 
Inc. 
Greetings 
*Hampshire Lincoln - 

Mercury 
Harlow Luggage Store 
Jack August 

Restaurant 
*Kresconko Studio 
Lennox Fuel, Inc. 
Maloney's Bakery 
**Moggio & Conz 
*Morrison Optician 
Munson Auto Supply 



Northampton Lumber 

Co. 
Northampton Music 

Center 
Northampton Plumbing 

Supply 
J. W. O'Brien & Son 

Insurance 
Overseas Wig 

Warehouse 
Paquette Vinyl 

Products 
*The Pleasant Market 
The Pleasant 

Pharmacy 
Plumb Auto Supply 
The Quill Bookshop 
Rhea Fuel Corp. 








WESTHAMPTON 
Cole Poultry Farm 

Inc. 
Charles M. Norris 

& Sons 
Fuller's Horse Farm 
*James O. Hickey, 

Builder 
Daniel B. Krug - 

Maple Products 
*F. A. Loud & Son 
*Loudville Store 
*Ray Sarafin, Builder 
*Westhampton Sand & 
Gravel 



Patrons 

Mr. & Mrs. David 

Adam 
***The American Year 

book Company 
Mr. & Mrs. Richard 

Ames 
Senator & Mrs. John 

D. Barrus 
***Class of 1971 

Mr. &Mrs. Francis 

Dresser 
Mr. & Mrs. Robert 

H. Edwards 
Mr. & Mrs. Roger 

Graves 
Mr. & Mrs. Stanley 

Greenberg 
Mrs. Ann LeDuc 

Irvine 
George D. Judd 
Mr. & Mrs. David 

LeDuc 
Mr. & Mrs. Henry 

Margenau 
* Archie C. McConnell 
Mr. & Mrs. Edward 

Molloy 
Mr. & Mrs. Albert 

Mosher Jr. 
Mr. & Mrs. Robert 

Nash 
Mr. & Mrs. Charles 

Nugent 
Mr. & Mrs. Robert 

T. O'Nei] 



Mr. & Mrs. Leslie 

Packard 
Wallace J. Puchalski 
Mr. & Mrs. Edwin 

Russell 
Mr. & Mrs. Harold 

Russell 
In Memory of Philip 

Russell 
Mr. & Mrs. Frank 

Vayda 
Donald Wickland 

FLORENCE 
*Andy's Pizza House 
Betty's Beauty Salon 
C & C Barber Shop 
Christenson Paint & 
Wallpaper Supply 
The Coffee Cup 
Cooper's Dairy 
G. A. Finck & Son 
Insurance Agency, 

Inc. 
Florence Atlantic 
Florence Casket 
Company 
*Florence Mobil 
*Florence Savings 
Bank 
Florence Texaco 
Herlihy's 



K eyes' Flower Shop 
Mario - Lee Hair 

Styles 
*Mel-An Stores Inc. 
Moriarty's Drug 

Store 
Murduff's Jewelry 

Store 
Murphy Real Estate 
Paddock's Cleaners 

and Tailors 
**Tobin Bros. , Inc. 
Variety & Package 

Store 
**West Clothing Center 

Store 
j. j. Winniger, Sr.j 
Associates, Real 

Estate 



ll i 



LEEDS 

'Crystal Spring Dairy 
Bar & Restaurant . 
Look Restaurant 

LITHIA 

Al's Sales & Service 

Blue Banner Farm 

EASTHAMPTON 
Northwestern Service 



SPRINGFIELD 
***Loring Studio